Pragmatic Progressivism

It’s no secret that I’m on the political left. It’s no secret that, as much as there’s a left-right divide in the church, I’m on the theological and ecclesiological left. I support things like a robust welfare state, universal healthcare, a universal basic income, an emphasis on diplomacy, and a host of other progressive causes. More than that, I support a charitable society; I hope for a world where there is not a needy person among us, because we share freely with each other as there is need.1Acts 4:32-37

I also recognize that, given the current political climate and the broader culture of the United States — let alone the world — many of these things are unlikely to happen without direct divine intervention. We live in an imperfect world. While I can hope — and work — for the Kingdom of God, I know that the most I will accomplish in my lifetime will fall far short of that.

Which bring me to the point I made in this post: there is eschatological hope and there is immanent hope. My eschatological hope is for the Kingdom of God. My immanent hope is for more immediately attainable things, like winning elections.

That is to say: I am a pragmatic progressive. I am interest is furthering our movement towards a world of greater justice and mercy, and I recognize that doing so may mean accepting imperfect incremental improvements. That doesn’t mean that I abandon my eschatological hope. It simply means that I don’t make the perfect the enemy of the good.

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People I Listen To: Preet Bharara

A while ago, I did a series of posts called ‘People I Read’. In that series, I gave little blurbs about the other blogs and sites I regularly read. It was sort of a callback to the blogrolls of the early days of blogs. I thought it would be nice to do something similar for the podcasts I listen to. So here is a new series of blurbs. As with the previous series, I’ll try to put up a new one every couple of weeks.

Today’s person I listen to is Preet Bharara.

Preet Bharara is the former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. Near the beginning of Donald Trump’s presidency, the administration asked for resignation letters from all 46 U.S. Attorneys who were still serving at the time. Bharara refused to resign and was fired. He is well-known for his anti-corruption stances  work and for being largely apolitical and fair-minded.

Stay Tuned with Preet is a podcast about justice and fairness, featuring Bharara talking with figures like John Miller, Bill Browder, and Jeff Flake about issues ranging from civil rights to the Russia investigation and beyond.

Listen on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.